To an athlete dying young an

Alliteration enhances the rhythm of the lines in the poem. Several literary devices are used to bring the poem to life. The poet has a particular message in each verse: Compare the boy in this poem to Marilyn Monroe. Today, she would be 85 years old.

Each quatrains has two couplets that rhyme. That is not how we remember her. The proud people of the town had carried him on their shoulders through the thoroughfare celebrating his victory. The speaker is praising the young deceased athlete for dying before he had to contend with the humiliation of seeing his record broken.

Today, the road all runners come, Townsman of a stiller town. They are bring him to his final resting place that the speaker colorfully calls, "a stiller town. A Change of Scene Today, the road all runners come, Shoulder-high we bring you home, And set you at your threshold down, Townsman of a stiller town.

For him the cheering had not begun to fade, and he will not have to experience that fading. The speaker is making an interesting analogy comparing the natural blooming of two flowers to the natural earthly events of human experience.

Therefore, the rhyming scheme is AABB. The boy is lucky that he died when he was still wearing his laurel wreath of victory. Immediately, the cheering scene of happiness and excitement shift to one of somber sadness.

Other metaphors are employed by the poet: The entire idea for Smart for Dying Smart lad, to slip betimes away From fields where glory does not stay, And early though the laurel grows It withers quicker than the rose.

Literally, the boy won a race which brought glory for him and his town. The theme of the poem speaks to a young person dying in his prime and being remember like that forever. The poem has seven stanzas written as quatrains. The audience of the poem is never told, because the speaker does not wish to focus on that incidental.

Smart lad, to slip betimes away From fields where glory does not stay, And early though the laurel grows It withers quicker than the rose. The speaker then calls the young man "smart lad. Holding the Winning Cup So set, before its echoes fade, The fleet foot on the sill of shade, And hold to the low lintel up The still-defended challenge-cup.

Addressing the Deceased Athlete The time you won your town the race We chaired you through the market-place; Man and boy stood cheering by, And home we brought you shoulder-high. This notion contrasts with the traditional and more ordinarily experienced view of death.

After musing on the loss of the young man, the speaker begins to take comfort in believing that his death was fortuitous for the young athlete who now would be spared seeing his record broken.

A. E. Housman's

Today, the road all runners come, Shoulder-high we bring you home, And set you at your threshold down, Townsman of a stiller town.

Glory does not last, but he died in the midst of his. The poem offers an unusual way of viewing and accepting death. Instead of becoming just another old athlete to see himself be replaced, he will not "swell the rout.To An Athlete Dying Young: THE time you won your town the race: We chaired you through the market-place; Man and boy stood cheering by, And home we brought you shoulder-high.

To-day, the road all runners come, 5: Shoulder-high we bring you home, And set you at your threshold down.

To An Athlete Dying Young

“To an Athlete Dying Young” is one of Housman’s most often anthologized poems. Its quiet, melancholy tone, its theme of the comfort of death, and its simplicity of form and style combine to make the poem a classic celebration of release from the difficulties of life.

A.E. Housman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" gives us a chance to consider just how high a value we place on fame.

To an Athlete Dying Young

Your reaction to the poem will be a pretty good indicator of your level of fame-obsession. You can probably tell from the title that "To an Athlete Dying Young" is a bit of a downer.

It is, surprise surprise, about an athlete who dies young. The poem starts off cheerfully enough, with the speaker remembering when the athlete won a big race and everyone in town celebrated by carrying the winner around the marketplace.

May 09,  · A. E. Housman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" has been widely anthologized through the decades since its first appearance in his autobiographical collection, A Shropshire Lad. The poem offers an unusual way of Reviews: 2. To An Athlete Dying Young A.

E. Housman, - The time you won your town the race We chaired you through the market-place; Man and boy stood cheering by, And .

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